Frequently Asked Questions about Schools and in-person learning

In-person learning is critical for the educational and social development of students of all ages. Ensuring that schools open and operate in a manner that prioritizes the health and safety of students, teachers, school staff, their families, and the community is a national priority.

In addition to following local and school requirements and getting vaccinated if eligible, children can protect themselves and others from contracting and spreading COVID-19 by wearing a well-fitting mask, washing their hands, social distancing, staying home if they are feeling sick, and getting tested if they were exposed to the virus or are symptomatic.

Updated October 12, 2021

The CDC recommends that all students, teachers, and staff at K-12 schools wear masks to protect children and the community against the spread of COVID-19. Along with COVID-19 vaccination, mask-wearing can play an important role in ending the pandemic. Especially in schools where children under 12 can’t yet get vaccinated, masks are a critical line of defense against the spread of COVID-19.

Data show that wearing masks in schools is effective in preventing COVID-19 outbreaks and keeping children safe. A CDC study found that schools without mask requirements were 3.5 times more likely to have COVID-19 outbreaks than schools that started the fall 2021 school year with mask requirements. In another analysis of 520 U.S. counties, the CDC found that in places where schools did not have mask requirements, pediatric COVID-19 cases rose at a  higher rate than in counties where schools do require masks.

Updated October 12, 2021

School policies, including COVID-19 guidance, are made at the state, local, district, and school levels. The CDC continues to recommend universal masking in K-12 schools, vaccination, distancing, ventilation, and other prevention strategies, and that additional measures be based on local vaccination and infection rates.

Updated October 12, 2021