Alerts are categorized as high, medium, and low risk.
  • High risk alerts: Narratives with widespread circulation across communities, high engagement, exponential velocity, and a high potential to impact health decisions. Are often more memorable than accurate information.
  • Medium risk alerts: Narratives that are circulating in priority populations and pose some threat to health. Potential for further spread due to the tactics used or because of predicted velocity. Often highlights the questions and concerns of people.
  • Low risk alerts: Narratives that are limited in reach, don’t impact your community, or lack the qualities necessary for future spread. May indicate information gaps, confusion, or concerns.

Based on early data, the emerging COVID-19 subvariant KP.2, a type of “FLiRT,” appears to be more infectious than the previously dominant JN.1 variant. Experts believe the variant may cause a rise in infections that will be less severe than previous surges. Although some social media users speculated that the variant may be tied to upcoming U.S. elections, most posts were simply sharing information about KP.2.

Recommendation: Low Risk Read More +

A recent New York Times article shares the stories of people who believe they have COVID-19 vaccine-related injuries and the challenges these individuals face. The article also discusses VAERS, research on COVID-19 vaccine safety, and the role the anti-vaccine movement plays in hurting the credibility of vaccine injury reports. In response, vaccine opponents and conspiracists accused the newspaper of “backtracking” about vaccine safety and baselessly claimed that vaccine injuries are underestimated. A popular news anchor revealed his own suspected vaccine injuries, setting off a wave of condemnation of the journalist who “pushed” COVID-19 vaccines and the legacy media that allegedly “concealed” vaccine injuries. 

Recommendation: High Risk Read More +

A social media user shared a story about having a heart attack that she claims was caused by COVID-19 vaccines. The video went viral with many vaccine opponents falsely claiming that young adults didn’t have heart attacks prior to the vaccine rollout. 

Recommendation: Medium Risk Read More +

A conspiracy news site known for publishing false claims about COVID-19 vaccines accused the CDC of concealing vaccine-related deaths. The alleged “smoking gun” is the agency investigating potential vaccine-related myocarditis deaths in 2021 and 2022. The article’s author also falsely claims that the CDC stated as recently as 2023 that no deaths have been linked to COVID-19 vaccines. 

Recommendation: Medium Risk Read More +

In early April, online discourse about the ongoing bird flu (H5N1) outbreak rose sharply following the first recorded case of a human contracting the virus from a cow. Reports of the virus being detected in cow’s milk have kept the outbreak in the news and social media conversations. Much of the content is focused on information sharing and concern about the growing outbreak. However, the topic has also drawn anti-vaccine ire, including conspiracy theories about global health entities and the upcoming election, false claims that bird flu is “100 times worse than the COVID-19 pandemic,” and general opposition to bird flu vaccines and outbreak protections.

Recommendation: Medium Risk Read More +

Vaccine manufacturer AstraZeneca acknowledged that thrombocytopenia syndrome (TSS) is a rare risk associated with its COVID-19 vaccine in court documents from an ongoing lawsuit in the U.K. This story has received widespread coverage on conspiracy and tabloid sites where it is misleadingly framed as a “bombshell” admission because this is the first time the company has acknowledged the adverse reaction in court, despite TTS being a known rare risk of both the Astra Zeneca and Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines since 2021. 

Recommendation: Medium Risk Read More +

Robert F. Kennedy Jr. resurfaced the three-year-old myth that Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccines had a 23 percent higher death rate than placebo in clinical trials. Kennedy insinuated that the vaccines caused those deaths and said that the vaccine was ineffective because it didn’t prevent COVID-19 deaths. A popular post sharing the clips of the interview cites surveys claiming that a quarter of Americans believe they know someone who died of a COVID-19 vaccine injury.  

Recommendation: High Risk Read More +

A discredited cardiologist falsely claims that all COVID-19 vaccines are unsafe and cause widespread serious health issues, including cardiac arrest and heart failure. The physician’s company sells a variety of “vaccine detox” products that claim will prevent the alleged harmful effects of COVID-19 vaccines.

Recommendation: Medium Risk Read More +

Several accounts expressed outrage that a New York hospital with a world-class pericardial/myocardial disease center ran an ad about treatments for inflammation of the heart muscle, or myocarditis. The posts suggest a conspiracy to normalize myocarditis caused by “experimental mRNA injections.”

Recommendation: Medium Risk Read More +

A video clip of a U.S. congressperson known for promoting vaccine disinformation is trending online. The congressperson falsely claimed that “studies” show that COVID-19 vaccines are dangerous and shared anecdotes of alleged vaccine-related injuries and deaths. She also argues that children should not be vaccinated against COVID-19.

Recommendation: Medium Risk Read More +

Alerts are categorized as high, medium, and low risk.
  • High risk alerts: Narratives with widespread circulation across communities, high engagement, exponential velocity, and a high potential to impact health decisions. Are often more memorable than accurate information.
  • Medium risk alerts: Narratives that are circulating in priority populations and pose some threat to health. Potential for further spread due to the tactics used or because of predicted velocity. Often highlights the questions and concerns of people.
  • Low risk alerts: Narratives that are limited in reach, don’t impact your community, or lack the qualities necessary for future spread. May indicate information gaps, confusion, or concerns.
Monthly Misinformation Report

Explore Public Good Project’s report highlighting high-level health trends. This report captures information from April 6th – May 5th, 2024.

Vaccine Misinformation Guide

Get practical tips for addressing misinformation in this new guide. Click image to download, or see highlights