Alerts are categorized as high, medium, and low risk.
  • High risk alerts: We recommend directly addressing and debunking the misinformation
  • Medium risk alerts: We recommend monitoring the situation but not actively engaging.
  • Low risk alerts: Provided for informational purposes. We do not recommend additional action at the moment.

A post in an online conspiracy community claims that data from the FDA shows a more than 16,000 percent increase in fetal death following COVID-19 vaccination. The post’s claim is a misleading interpretation of VAERS data, which cannot be used to determine if an adverse event, like fetal death, is directly linked to vaccination. Between 10 and 20 percent of pregnancies end in miscarriage or stillbirth. The rate is not different for those who were vaccinated while pregnant. Research shows that COVID-19 vaccination does not increase the risk of pregnancy complications, birth defects, miscarriages, or stillbirths. 

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The false claim that COVID-19 vaccine boosters weaken the immune system and cause vaccine-induced AIDS continues to circulate online. There is no evidence that COVID-19 vaccines or boosters weaken the immune system. Boosters strengthen the immune system’s ability to fight COVID-19.

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A prominent anti-vaccine activist who previously made headlines for claiming that COVID-19 vaccines can magnetize people is now promoting the false claim that “every vaccinated person over 30” will develop vaccine-induced AIDS by the end of the year. Vaccine-induced AIDS is not a real condition, and COVID-19 vaccines don’t impair the immune system. 

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A video clip has resurfaced that features Dr. Anthony Fauci in a 2004 interview saying that a recent influenza infection provides sufficient protection to skip the flu shot. Vaccine opponents are using the clip to claim that reliance on “natural immunity” should apply to COVID-19 vaccines. COVID-19 and the flu are not the same disease and should not be treated as such. Health authorities recommend COVID-19 vaccination for people who have recovered from COVID-19 because the vaccine provides more reliable protection. Among people who have had COVID-19, those who are vaccinated are significantly less likely to be reinfected than those who remain unvaccinated.

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A social media post with nearly 49,000 engagements falsely claims that people vaccinated against COVID-19 continue to get sick while unvaccinated people are “healthy and thriving.” While it’s true that the Omicron variant infected fully vaccinated people more than previous variants, unvaccinated people are still more susceptible to Omicron infections. Additionally, fully vaccinated people are far better protected against severe disease and death from Omicron than unvaccinated people. Boosters further increase that protection.

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A drummer in an American rock band died suddenly at age 50 after being admitted to the hospital with chest pains. Immediately after the death was reported, vaccine opponents began attributing the musician’s cause of death to myocarditis related to the COVID-19 vaccine. No cause of death has not been reported. There is no evidence that COVID-19 vaccination is related to the musician’s death.

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Vaccine opponents are misrepresenting a recent study that assessed a group of 15 children who were diagnosed with myopericarditis (inflammation of heart muscles) after receiving the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine. Of the 15 patients, 10 had abnormal cardiac activity when evaluated. A physician with a large online following who has previously spread vaccine misinformation posted that 63 percent of children in the study experienced the abnormality without clarifying that the study only included a small group of children experiencing a rare vaccine side effect. The post also fails to mention that all of the children improved quickly after receiving treatment.

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A widely shared social media post falsely claims that the COVID-19 vaccine clinical trial and approval process was rushed, suggesting that there was not enough data to determine if the vaccines were safe and effective. The post has garnered nearly 35,000 engagements in just a few days. It is true that COVID-19 vaccines were developed on an unprecedentedly short timeline. However, that is not a sign of poor or “rushed” science, but rather a culmination of decades of scientific advancements. The vaccines were able to be developed in under a year because researchers were building on in-depth knowledge of coronaviruses, decades of mRNA research, and historic global collaboration and funding.

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Several social media posts and conspiracy news articles are claiming that a new study proves that the pharmaceutical company Moderna created SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. The claim has been disputed by the study’s author, an ophthalmologist with no background in vaccine or immunology research, who says the study was an investigation into the origin of the virus and didn’t implicate Moderna. Multiple independent experts in the field have questioned the quality and validity of the study and its findings.

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A video making the rounds on social media in the Philippines falsely claims that the anti-parasitic medication ivermectin is an effective alternative to the COVID-19 vaccine. The video was posted by an anti-abortion account and appears to suggest that people opposed to abortion may want to avoid the COVID-19 vaccine, likely due to the myth that the vaccines contain fetal tissue. There is no evidence that ivermectin can effectively prevent or treat COVID-19. A recent study found that ivermectin was no more effective than placebo at preventing hospitalization in COVID-19 patients. 

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Alerts are categorized as high, medium, and low risk.
  • High risk alerts: We recommend directly addressing and debunking the misinformation
  • Medium risk alerts: We recommend monitoring the situation but not actively engaging.
  • Low risk alerts: Provided for informational purposes. We do not recommend additional action at the moment.
Vaccine Misinformation Guide

Get practical tips for addressing misinformation in this new guide. Click image to download.

Vaccine Misinformation Guide

Get practical tips for addressing misinformation in this new guide. Click image to download, or see highlights