Alerts are categorized as high, medium, and low risk.
  • High risk alerts: We recommend directly addressing and debunking the misinformation
  • Medium risk alerts: We recommend monitoring the situation but not actively engaging.
  • Low risk alerts: Provided for informational purposes. We do not recommend additional action at the moment.

In an interview, a physician who promotes misinformation about COVID-19 vaccines claims he has seen a rise in pregnancy complications in vaccinated women. The anecdote is unsupported by data. Several studies have shown that there is no link between COVID-19 vaccines and pregnancy complications.

Recommendation: Direct Response Read More +

A social media post with nearly 1,000 engagements, including 350 comments, falsely claims that a keto (low-carbohydrate, high-fat) diet can remove spike proteins that the COVID-19 vaccine prompts cells to produce. This claim seems to be based on a misconception that proteins are simply nutrients, rather than vital molecules that carry out important biological functions. The human body has tens of thousands of naturally occurring proteins that support every bodily function. No diet removes these proteins or the spike protein from the body.

Recommendation: Passive Response Read More +

A social media post has resurfaced the false claim that the American Red Cross does not accept blood donations from people who are vaccinated. The American Red Cross website clearly states that people vaccinated against COVID-19 are welcome to donate blood, platelets, and plasma.

Recommendation: Ignore Read More +

A recent study analyzing severe heart inflammation following COVID-19 vaccination in four Nordic countries found that, while still rare, the risk was increased in young men. Widely shared social media posts have misrepresented the study’s findings to claim that the rare risk is actually widespread. The study explicitly notes that myocarditis after vaccination is rare “even among young males,” and concludes that the risk should continue to be evaluated. The study also found that COVID-19 infection increased the risk of heart inflammation, particularly among adults over age 40.

Recommendation: Passive Response Read More +

During a speech about equity and racial justice, the U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary mistakenly said that COVID-19 vaccines are killing people of color at twice the rate of white people. The comment has been shared thousands of times on social media and right-wing news sites, despite the White House clarifying that the secretary misspoke. The HHS and Biden administration have been enthusiastic proponents of COVID-19 vaccination and equitable access to vaccines for racial minorities who are disproportionately impacted by COVID-19. The comment was likely meant to emphasize that COVID-19—not the vaccines—has killed Black, Latino, and American Indian people at more than twice the rate of white people.

Recommendation: Direct Response Read More +

In an interview with an entrepreneur who is well known for promoting vaccine misinformation, an airline pilot claimed that he was informed by a cardiologist that 30 percent of vaccinated pilots would fail flight health screenings due to vaccine injuries. The claim has been promoted on social media and conservative news sites for the past week. Pilots undergo annual or biannual health screenings to evaluate their ability to fly, and there is no evidence that vaccinated pilots have experienced an increase in health issues affecting their fitness. One of the purportedly vaccine-injured pilots has claimed that a heart attack that occurred more than six months after he was vaccinated was caused by the vaccine. Again, no evidence was provided to support this claim.

Recommendation: Passive Response Read More +

An author who was removed from social media platforms for promoting vaccine misinformation has falsely claimed that an American Medical Association document says that people are receiving varying dosages of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine based on the vaccine "batch." In fact, the document lists the vaccines for different age groups and one formulation that contains a stabilizing ingredient.

Recommendation: Passive Response Read More +

An article on a U.K.-based conspiracy news site uses VAERS data to claim that 4,000 fetal or newborn deaths are linked to COVID-19 vaccines. It’s important to remember that VAERS reports are unverified and cannot be determined to be caused by a specific vaccine. The number of VAERS reports of fetal or newborn deaths that occurred at some point after vaccination is not the accurate number of vaccine-related deaths. An analysis of VAERS reports found under 1,800 reports of fetal or newborn death after COVID-19 vaccination but the causes of the deaths or even whether the death actually occurred cannot be determined from VAERS data.

Recommendation: Direct Response Read More +

After a vaccinated congressperson tested positive for COVID-19, he noted that being vaccinated and boosted made him less likely to become seriously ill. In response, a conservative commentator responded that many unvaccinated people have mild COVID-19 infections, so that isn’t a reason to get vaccinated. Numerous studies have demonstrated that vaccinated people are at a significantly lower risk of becoming seriously ill, and people with boosters have an even lower risk. Vaccines are life-saving particularly for people over age 65, like the congressman, and those who are immunocompromised, pregnant, or have conditions that make them particularly vulnerable to COVID-19.

Recommendation: Direct Response Read More +

A social media post that received over 250 engagements before being flagged as misinformation falsely claims that COVID-19 vaccines contain “HIV lipid wrappers.” COVID-19 vaccines use fat molecules called lipids to enclose and protect mRNA as it is being delivered to cells. The lipids are simply delivery vehicles for the vaccine and don’t contain HIV, SARS-CoV-2, or any other virus.

Recommendation: Passive Response Read More +

Alerts are categorized as high, medium, and low risk.
  • High risk alerts: We recommend directly addressing and debunking the misinformation
  • Medium risk alerts: We recommend monitoring the situation but not actively engaging.
  • Low risk alerts: Provided for informational purposes. We do not recommend additional action at the moment.
Vaccine Misinformation Guide

Get practical tips for addressing misinformation in this new guide. Click image to download.

Vaccine Misinformation Guide

Get practical tips for addressing misinformation in this new guide. Click image to download, or see highlights